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Chris Booth

CHRIS BOOTH, b. 1949 Kerikeri

After studying at Ilam School of Fine Arts, Canterbury University, New Zealand in 1967 and 1968, Booth undertook two years of specialist sculpture study with prominent sculptors including Barbara Hepworth, Denis Mitchell, John Milne (UK) and Quinto Ghermandi (Italy). Between 1978-2001, solo exhibitions of his works were held in all the major public galleries in New Zealand and in prestigious Australian and Italian galleries. His work was also included in collective exhibitions throughout NZ and Europe, and in Singapore and Australia.

As his work became increasingly sought-after internationally, Booth began to focus on commissioned work. From New Zealand to Europe, in North America and Asia, stunning examples of his sculptures can be found. Ranging from the monumental to the ethereal in appearance, some appear to defy gravity while others use organic processes to allow a shifting in their position over time. Whether towering above, or ensconced at ground level, Booth’s sculptures inspire a sense of spiritual connection with place and, with their enduring materials, provoke thoughts of future generations. Booth always creates his sculptures for specific sites. They are inspired by and honour each site’s local history, mythology and cultures and require intensive research, and consultation with local indigenous people. Usually gigantic in proportion, these phenomenal sculptures are amazing feats of engineering and balance that assert their presence yet sit comfortably within their surroundings.

CONTACT
To see more examples of Booth’s sculptures, visit his website.
To commission a sculpture, email Chris Booth direct.


LINKS
Wikipedia entry on Booth
greenmuseum.org (online museum for environmental art) page on Booth
Connells Bay website featuring Chris Booth – with scrolling images
Booth’s 2.8m high ‘Peacemakersculpture, Wellington Sculpture Trust website
‘Chris Booth’s Nga Tamariki a Tane’, by Malcolm Ross, Art New Zealand 30, Autumn 1984